Lotus in August at Biltmore Estate

Lotus has always been a symbol of Buddhism to me, but there is another symbol of strength in relation that I heard when I was little, and read it here that its symbolic characteristic of the Lotus flower leads from the observation that the plant’s stalk is easy to bend in two, but is very hard to break because of its many strong sinuous fibers. Poets use this to represent a close unbreakable relationship between two lovers or the members within a family, showing that no matter how far away they might live nothing can really separate them in heart.

My last visit was the peak season for the Water Lilies, and I’m surprised to see a different variety of Lotus at this time of the year. I’ve seen the big round leaves before but have never seen its Lotus flower until now, I often called this a Buddha Lotus but really don’t know the official name.

This leave has a heart shape.

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My Dad’s Garden in Early July

It has been a while since I updated my dad’s garden.  I took this picture on June 28th, got up extra early before sunrise.

Things have changed since then. My visit yesterday started out with chasing this butterfly, Lee did most of the chasing.  My dad and second sister never saw it but luckily I was able to capture it with my camera, butterfly is a very fascinating creature to me.

Crape myrtle was one of my mom’s favorite flower trees, we planted some at my dad’s house and they came out earlier than ours, I’ve 3 light pink Crape myrtle trees at my house.

Looks can be deceiving, this might appear to be very fruitful but no pumpkin thus far, my second sister thinks that she is loosing her ‘green thumb’ touch.

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Wat Lao Buddhavong July 4th, 2009 Water Lilies in July

Continued from Wat Lao Buddhavong July 4th, 2009 the 30 Year Anniversary Celebration

As I’ve mentioned in my Lotus or Water Lily at Biltmore post that in Buddhism, the lotus is one of the Eight Auspicious Symbols and one of the most poignant representations of Buddhist teaching, so not surprised to see it here at Wat Lao Buddhavong. In Buddhist teaching, the roots of a lotus are in the mud, the stem grows up through the water, and the heavily scented flower lies pristinely above the water, basking in the sunlight. This pattern of growth signifies the progress of the soul from the primeval mud of materialism, through the waters of experience, and into the bright sunshine of enlightenment (source).

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