Collecting Seeds

My dad is pretty good in collecting seeds for next year planting season.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/50sec, ISO 400, focal length 98mm, evaluative metering

He labeled them in Lao language and keeps them in a dry place.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/50sec, ISO 400, focal length 200mm, evaluative metering

The pumpkin seeds still need several days of sun to dry.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/2500sec, ISO 100, focal length 87mm, evaluative metering

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/2500sec, ISO 100, focal length 200mm, evaluative metering

The Chili peppers are hung to dry.

Canon T2i, EF 17-40mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/40sec, ISO 200, focal length 40mm, evaluative metering

I asked my dad for string bean seeds to give to a friend, the hand-sewn cloth bag will be easy to transport by mail and also good for storing seeds.

Canon T2i, EF 70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/8, 1/20sec, ISO 400, focal length 145mm, cropped, evaluative metering, tripod mounted

I also asked my dad for the Asian corn seeds.Β  When he brought it down from the kitchen cabinet he was shocked to see what had happened to them.Β  He dried them last month and stored them in a cooler, I guess the hot and humid temperature inside the cooler must have caused the moisture and moldy.Β  I’m glad we found it in time but he didn’t feel comfortable giving these away not knowing if they will germinate next Spring. As for seeds, it is best to store them in a cool area until planting time, I guess now he knows.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/2500sec, ISO 100, focal length 154mm, evaluative metering

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/2500sec, ISO 100, focal length 118mm, evaluative metering

6 thoughts on “Collecting Seeds

  1. Sorry to hear the corn got all moldy. They must have not dried completely.

    These seeds will be appreciated! Seeds are amazing… and nature is wonderful. πŸ™‚

    • Cambree, he thought they were dried when he put them away, I guess not since I saw water moisture on the cooler lid. I hope he can still use some of them in the Spring. It’s amazing to see things grow, makes me want to have huge farm land. πŸ™‚

  2. It’s great that you’re saving your seeds just like what the Norwegians are doing.

    You could probably prevent moisture by storing salt in the same container. Salt soaks up a little bit of the moisture. But the easiest precaution is to store dry seeds right on the cabinet right above the cooking stove. But I store my seeds in a vacuum packed bags. I can even throw these bags in the fish tank and they don’t go moldy. You can even bury them and they don’t go bad.

    The vacuum sucks out the moisture from the bag. Bugs can’t breath and also die out. I vacuum my bags to 29.92″ of mercury but you might get away with 24″ of mercury with those low cost Kmart machines.

    • Hi Zeddicus, it’s interesting how you store your seeds, I would be afraid that they won’t be able to breath and will die like the bugs. πŸ™‚

      I think my dad was afraid that the bugs would get to it and stored it in a small cooler. I need to tell him about the salt, I didn’t realize that it sucks out water. I guess it’s the opposite from human, we retain water when intake too much sodium. I like to store my seeds in a cloth bag, it feels dry and breathable.

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