My Dad’s Garden June 18, 2011

We had a father’s day cookout at my dad’s house on Saturday and the storm swept through the area that evening and made it very difficult to grill outside.  We managed but I didn’t get a chance to take any picture of the foods. After the storm had passed, I went outside to photograph his garden.

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/25307646 w=515&h=290]

I uploaded my video in HD format, if you have a slow internet connection please watch in Youtube.

I was surprised to see how tall his corns got, his garden takes on a different height with all the string beans climbing the trellis and reaching the top.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/11, 1/20sec, ISO 400, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

I missed part of elementary school education in the US and read about the corn from Lee’s library book.  The corn  plants have both male and female parts, the male part is known as the tassel (picture below). The tassel usually consists of several branches that looks very much like rice pods, and it has many small male flowers. Each male flower releases a large number of pollen grains, each of which contains the male sex cell.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/80sec, ISO 400, focal length 176mm, evaluative metering

The female floral organ is called an ear, my dad calls it the corn. The immature ear consists of a cob, eggs that develop into kernels after pollination, and silks. Pollination occurs when pollen falls on the exposed silks. Following pollination, a male sex cell grows down each silk to a single egg and fertilization, the union of the male and female sex cells occurs. The fertilized egg develops into a kernel and inside each kernel is a single embryo of a new plant. These are small white Asian corn.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/125sec, ISO 400, focal length 200mm, cropped, evaluative metering

My sister’s tomatoes are huge.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/40sec, ISO 400, focal length 122mm, evaluative metering

The storm had broke off one of the branches of the Thai eggplant. It was extremely high wind if you had a chance to watch the beginning of the video.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/125sec, ISO 400, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

Lemongrass

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/80sec, ISO 400, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

Chili peppers

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/100sec, ISO 400, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

It has been very dry and we got about 2/3 inch of rain.  Even though it ruined our cookout plan, but none of us were complaining since we desperately needed the rain.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/100sec, ISO 400, focal length 200mm, evaluative metering

The cucumber plants need a lot of water to bear fruits that will stick.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/125sec, ISO 400, focal length 113mm, evaluative metering

It has been several years since my dad planted the string beans here. This is a good spot since it gets plenty of sunlight during the day.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/11, 1/25sec, ISO 400, focal length 91mm, evaluative metering

There’s the string bean.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/125sec, ISO 400, focal length 100mm, evaluative metering

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/11, 1/25sec, ISO 400, focal length 81mm, evaluative metering

Crab apples

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/80sec, ISO 400, focal length 176mm, evaluative metering

Pears

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/100sec, ISO 400, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/200sec, ISO 400, focal length 168mm, evaluative metering

Jasmine

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/320sec, ISO 400, focal length 163mm, evaluative metering

It was the 21st week of blooming when the lower branch flowers fell off. I think the top branch flowers still have a few weeks to go.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/13sec, ISO 400, focal length 131mm, evaluative metering, tripod mounted

11 thoughts on “My Dad’s Garden June 18, 2011

    • Thanks seeharhed, I would love to own a lens that would go below f/4, that’s the lowest it would go for all my lenses. My dad plants enough for my sisters that live in NYC, it used to be enough for us too before I have my own garden.

    • salalao, I’ve been wanting to buy the jasmine from the temple but never have enough room in the car.

      I’ve never heard of her before, maybe my sisters would know her. I like the Lao classical dancers and would go to the temple just to watch that. 🙂

  1. I actually heard of Baithong but can’t tell you her hit song. hahahhahah I think I downloaded her songs a year or so ago. I’ll go through my external drive and see if I can post her song for you guys to sample.

    Like to check out that temple again in the near future. But, something about the east coast heat and humidity.

    • I never heard of her neither- I lookup on U- tube one song came up Mor lum song. I went to ethaicd site no name found. Almost every night I listen to streaming radio luktoong mahanakorn 95 FM never hear her name nor on the top 10 luketoong billborard

      I can’t get over the fact you saw Takatan.

      Oh yes let me know when you visit the East- We can do beer lao and johnny blue. 🙂

    • cambree, I do love Jasmine green tea, I might have to give this a try tomorrow since they have so many in bloom right now and a few dried flowers.

  2. Thanks for your stories and all the fine photos from your dads garden, it’s a pleasure to follow how all the plants are growing here – the climate where you live is warmer than in Denmark.

    • Hi truels, it amazes me of how fast things grow in his garden. The weather is a lot warmer here, and the rains/thunderstorms in the evening help tremendously.

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