Harvesting Bamboo Shoots

Our family went to the local temple Wat Greensboro to Tum Boun (merit making) for our mom on Mother’s Day.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/6sec, ISO 100, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

I knew it was bamboo season also, so we took the opportunity to visit the temple ground where we knew there were plenty of bamboo shoots. We asked the monk for a permission and headed toward the back after they performed a Buddhist ceremony for our mom.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/30sec, ISO 100, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

If you are thinking about growing the bamboo trees in your back yard do think twice because they spread like wildfire and will appear in your neighbor’s yard one fine Spring day.  I don’t think they’ll be singing Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood theme song.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/250sec, ISO 100, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

Freshly cut bamboo shoots, I’m thinking of bamboo soup at the moment.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/640sec, ISO 100, focal length 75mm, evaluative metering

My niece helped her mom harvest the bamboo.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/250sec, ISO 100, focal length 98mm, evaluative metering

It’s been a long time ago since I last saw thorns in the bamboo bushes.  Back in Laos and Thailand the bamboo bushes that are in the forest have thorns, and those that grow near the village don’t have thorns.  They are called Gor Pai Banh, loosely translated as the village bamboo. So these are a village bamboo, no thorns in this bush.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/60sec, ISO 100, focal length 70mm, evaluative metering

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/5.6, 1/160sec, ISO 100, focal length 73mm, evaluative metering

And my sister made a bamboo soup today, must be my lucky day. The photo was taken with the new lens.

Canon T2i, EF 17-40mm f/4L USM lens, Manual, f/4, 1/10sec, ISO 100, focal length 40mm, evaluative metering

10 thoughts on “Harvesting Bamboo Shoots

  1. Nye, ever heard the old history stories about bamboo bushes with thorns? It is called “Pai Narm” in lao, which translate it too bamboo bushes with thorns. As the story were told, the King of Laos had planted bamboo bushes with thorns surrounded the kingdom and made it nearly impossible for Thai army invade.

    • seeharhed, I’ve never heard the history before, I like to see that place. I bet the bamboo shoot from Pai Narm would taste better since it’s harder to get. I heard a story of a man that got scared and went inside the gor pai narm to hide and when he tried to come out he couldn’t. I guess when you are scared you just don’t think sometimes.

    • mozemoua, we actually enjoy harvesting bamboo, made me think of back home. My mom used to take us when we were little. 🙂

      The fresh bamboo tastes so good, I usually get sick from eating too much.

  2. Fresh bamboo is one of the best things in life.

    Gathering bamboo would be a fun experience. I would have to wear long sleeve shirt and boots since the leaves look sharp and itchy.

    • Cambree, my sister Bee wore long sleeves and brought gloves for all of us to wear. It’s really a treat to have fresh bamboo and you can find them at the Asian market during this time of the year.

    • Hi truels, I think you can harvest them in Denmark also. I’ve never heard of bamboo being poison, unlike mushroom where you have to be extra careful. The bamboos don’t come up all year round, just when they are in season and that’s usually during the spring time.

  3. Hi Nye, still remember me??? Its been quite sometimes after I left wordpress. lol!!! I love แกงหน่อไม้ a lot!!! Noon always cook it for me!!! In Malaysia, I always go to a Burmese minimart to get the bamboo shoot.

    • Hi Eeren, I still follow your blog through Google reader. 🙂

      I think แกงหน่อไม้สด is the best, in the US we have to rely on can or frozen หน่อไม้ when it’s not in season. I would love to plant them in my backyard but they spread so fast and it’s kind of scary.

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