Food, Hobby

Chicken Update October 30, 2010

It has been 31 weeks and the young hens are hatching their own chicken peeps. This Americana hen has been sitting on 11 eggs for 21 days now and she has hatched 7 out of 11 eggs yesterday and today.Β  These were not all her eggs though, Bo’s mom picked the biggest eggs and she didn’t seem to mind that all are not her eggs or perhaps she couldn’t tell I’m not sure.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/125sec, ISO 1000, Exposure bias 0step, focal length 75mm, pattern metering

Prior to this hen, also an Americana hen had hatched 9 peeps and she has been looking after them.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/320sec, ISO 400, Exposure bias 0step, focal length 180mm, pattern metering

As you can see that the peeps are from different mother hens, but this Americana hen didn’t seem to mind and might be that she knew that she hatched all of them.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 400, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering

They love going into Grandma’s garden because there are plenty of insects and vegetables there.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 250, Exposure bias 0step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering
Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 200, Exposure bias 0step, focal length 168mm, pattern metering

All they have to do is jumped the fence and they are in.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/320sec, ISO 640, Exposure bias 0step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering

The new additions to the hen house are the Old English Game hens.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/100sec, ISO 400, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 78mm, pattern metering

The Old English Game has been seen in Great Britain since the 19th Century and is a descendant of the ancient fighting cocks. The breed hasn’t changed very much for over a thousand years. They were probably the first breed of chicken ever developed in Britain and have always been fighting birds. (source)

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/200sec, ISO 640, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 122mm, pattern metering

It’s interesting to see the various breeds running around, such as the Americana hen with beard.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 250, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering

And the Rhode Island Red, this rooster has a beautiful coat and not to mention the rooster comb.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 320, Exposure bias -1step, focal length 172mm, pattern metering

The Americana rooster.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/250sec, ISO 160, Exposure bias -0.7step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering

A very dominant breed and very aggressive in nature.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/320sec, ISO 320, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 200mm, pattern metering

One thing that they all have in common is that they all love to eat.

Aperture Priority, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/4, 1/125sec, ISO 400, Exposure bias -0.3step, focal length 75mm, pattern metering

Photos and video were taken with the telephoto lens.

7 thoughts on “Chicken Update October 30, 2010”

  1. I think chickens are handsome birds, and I loved the ones my Grandma had. I always pay close attention to them at the Fair.

    However. I have no desire to pet them or hold them or keep them at my house. It’s very nice to admire them from a distance. This is about the right distance! That rooster closeup, the one with the fierce comb and the lovely bokeh, that rooster photo is very fine, Nye.

    1. Hi Gerry, they are very friendly and know their routine well. Bo likes them and I don’t mind having some, perhaps someday we will buy a house with a little land that we could have our own little farm. πŸ™‚

    1. Thanks Scott. They move quickly and the telephoto lens did a good job in capturing it from a distance, I feel more comfortable using it now.

    1. Cambree, I think they are insulated everywhere, should be very warm and comfy this winter. It’s a lot of fun photographing chickens, they don’t seem to complain if I take a picture of their bad side. πŸ™‚

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