Kao Mao or Young Sticky Rice Dessert


Click here to watch this video on YouTube

We visited Grandma on Sunday and very fortunate that PaNoy and his family also visited and brought some young sticky rice from his garden to make Kao Mao or young sticky rice dessert.

His mom separated the young green rice from the mature golden color rice since they have to be cooked separately.  It doesn’t take as long to cook the young rice, I think that’s what she said.

His mom removed the rice from the branches.

Grandma then cooked the rice with pods in medium heat.

She then removed the rice pods with a mortar and pestle. Grandma came from Southern Laos and she said that people in her village would tum kao, which is a process of removing rice pods with a big wooden mortar and pestle during the day time.  And at night the young ladies in the village would tum kao mao, and the bachelors would listen to see which house was making Kao Mao and would visit the young lady’s house.  I guess the house that tum kao mao would have gentlemen callers.  If you understand Lao, she was telling this story in the video.

She made a dessert with Asian potato from her garden.  This was Bo’s bowl.

I recently have many foods allergy and couldn’t eat so she gave me a bowl of plain Kao Mao and it was delicious.

PaNoy made pickled crab apples for us to try.  After talking to him I realized that the process of canning is different between the American and Laotian. He canned his when the water is still hot, and I would let the water to cool down first before pouring into the jar, that’s how my mom taught me.  I guess the process made a huge different in taste, and after learning about canning the American way I think I would still stick with the Laotian style of canning.

His brother Nuk made hot chili sauces and too bad I can’t try since he has so many ingredients.  I could only eat basic seasoning of salt, sugar and black pepper these days. I wish him best of luck in marketing and selling his hot sauces.

All photos and video were shot with a Canon T2i and EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens.

Kannom Kaopoad

My second sister saw Kanom Fak Thong or Pumpkin Pudding dessert in a Thai Magazine and thought it would be good to give it a try. The ingredients suggested that we could substitute the pumpkin with corn and since she has some fresh corns at home we decided to make Kanom Kaopoad or Corn Pudding instead.

Here are the ingredients in English.

1 1/2  cups of grated pumpkin (we substitute with corns)
3/4 cup rice flour
1/2 cup tapioca flour
3/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup salt
1 cup sugar
1 cup coconut cream

Topping:

3/4 cup shredded coconut
1/4 cup salt (we used less)

Mix rice flour, tapioca flour, and corns (or pumpkins) together. Add coconut cream, salt, sugar and shredded coconut.  Mix well together until the sugar is dissolved.

For topping mix shredded coconut with salt.

We decided to use my dad’s banana leaves that he has in the freezer to make banana leaf cups. My sister used a small bow as a measuring size and I used 2 round panels letting the grain to go in the opposite direction (see picture below) to strengthen the banana leaf cup. I pinned 4 sides with toothpicks.

Then steam the Kanom Kaopoad in banana leaf cups for 20 minutes. I took the lid off to take picture, it should be covered when steamed.

I have to say that the banana leaf cup brings out the flavor of the Kanom Kaopoad. You could use small ceramic bowls for this also, the Kanom would come out like the ones in the Thai magazine.

Then we tried to make some with the Kanom Krok tray.

It doesn’t taste as good and kind of tough to chew.  I like the steamed version better.

As for Lunch on Saturday my sister made Pho Shrimp Kai for us, it was delicious.

Random Thoughts and Random Photos

Sometimes it is hard to tell from an image if it’s day or night.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/8, 1/40sec, ISO 100, focal length 200mm, white balance cloudy, evaluative metering

Sunrise or sunset

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/8, 1/30sec, ISO 100, focal length 200mm, white balance cloudy, evaluative metering

If you are living the life that you really want, and only to find out that this is not for you. Perhaps you already wore the clothes that you were meant to wear.  I know, at least you can say I’ve been there and done that.

Aperture Priority, EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM lens, f/5.6, 1/20sec, ISO 3200, focal length 70mm, exposure bias 0step, white balance auto, evaluative metering

I do long for hot summer days.

Taken at Biltmore Estate in June 2010

Where the flowers are everywhere.

Taken at Biltmore Estate in June 2010

Because everywhere I turn there’s very little color.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/5.6, 1/200sec, ISO 100, focal length 200mm, white balance sunny, center weighted metering

It’s Saturday morning, and I’m making my favorite dessert, Coffee Grass Jelly.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/5.6, 1/4sec, ISO 100, focal length 122mm, white balance shade, center weighted metering, tripod mounted

Then Lee and I visited my dad in the afternoon, and my second sister made a Jelly dessert also.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/5.6, 1/400sec, ISO 1600, focal length 154mm, white balance shade, center weighted average metering

My mom orchid is in bloom, there is another shoot coming out from the top as well.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/5.6, 1/13sec, ISO 100, focal length 75mm, white balance shade, evaluative metering

Natural lighting does wonder for indoor photography.

Manual, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, f/5.6, 1/15sec, ISO 100, focal length 159mm, white balance shade, evaluative metering