Jack Dempsey Fry 13 Week Old

Click here to view this video on YouTube

The Jack Dempsey Fry are 13 week old.  This is Bo’s hand and as you can see that some Fry are bigger than others.  I’m glad that they are not piranhas, otherwise they would have feasted on his hand.

Lee was feeding them brine shrimps.

They moved so fast that I had to bump my ISO to 6400 so the image below is grainy.

The moon has risen by the time I got home. This is a 10 seconds long exposure, I had it set on self-timer and a tripod is a must. I was surprised to see lens flare at the bottom near the window, this image is not so bad in comparison to a few that I took.  I don’t know how to control this, I tried the lens hood but it didn’t help.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, Aperture Priority, f/5.6, 10sec, ISO 200, Exposure Bias -4 step, focal length 87mm, spot metering, tripod mounted

November Frosty Moon

November’s full moon is also known as Full Beaver Moon. This was the time to set beaver traps before the swamps froze, and to ensure a supply of warm winter furs. Another interpretation suggests that the name Full Beaver Moon comes from the fact that the beavers are now actively preparing for winter. It is sometimes also referred to as the Frosty Moon, and perhaps this is a more appropriate name since it’s freezing cold outside while taking pictures of the moon.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, AV, f/8, 1/640sec, ISO 200, Exposure Bias -0.7 step, focal length 200mm, closeup cropped, spot metering, tripod mounted

According to an astronomer Geoff Gaherty, “The Full Moon rises around sunset and sets around sunrise, the only night in the month when the moon is in the sky all night long. The rest of the month, the moon spends at least some time in the daytime sky.” Other names for this month’s moon include its Hindi name of Kartik Poornima and Sinhala (Buddhist) name Il Poya, according to Gaherty.

Tonight the moon will appear near the bright planet Jupiter, which is shining off to the moon’s right. Both objects can be found in the constellation Aries as they make their way across the night sky tonight. Source.

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, AV, f/4, 1/200sec, ISO 200, Exposure Bias -5 step, focal length 188mm, closeup cropped, spot metering, flash, tripod

Canon T2i, EF70-200mm f/4L USM lens, AV, f/4, 1/200sec, ISO 200, Exposure Bias -5 step, focal length 188mm, closeup cropped, spot metering, flash, tripod